Protecting the Natural Beauty of the North Coast 

If you have ever enjoyed the shores of Hare Creek Beach, the stunning views from Pelican Bluffs, the meanderings of Spring Ranch Trail or had a rendezvous at Lovers Lane in Ukiah Valley, you owe a debt of thanks to the Mendocino Land Trust for all the love, care, and sweat equity that goes into protecting the natural beauty of these sites to name but a few.

Since its formation in 1976 the Mendocino Land Trust has been working tirelessly behind the scenes to conserve the natural beauty in Mendocino County. Over the last 43 years they have protected over 13,000 acres of working farms, trails, wetlands, coastlines and woodlands on the North Coast of California through its environmentally conscious efforts.

Wildflowers on the North Coast

Wildflowers on the North Coast

A 501(c)(3) nonprofit, the Land Trust’s  mission is, “to conserve important natural resources of Mendocino County including working farmlands and forests, wildlife habitat, open space, scenic vistas, watersheds, and to facilitate public access.

The Land Trust also provides stewardship and hands on educational opportunities on lands that it has conserved to develop a deeper feeling of connection by people to the land and water of Mendocino County. They encourage healthy recreational activity in the natural settings of Mendocino County and strive for sustainable experiences for all residents and visitors.

It is no small task, conserving, protecting and maintaining these stunningly beautiful natural landscapes for current and future generations. Take a look at all the Mendocino Land Trust’s impact by clicking here.

Cypress Tree overlooking the coast.

Cypress Tree overlooking the coast.

The Mendocino Land Trust’s current efforts include new trails allowing the public more access to the California Coastal National Monument while working hard to expand the monument as well. Other projects include enhancing the headwaters of the Noyo River for salmon spawning, the James Creek barrier modification to allow salmon to travel more easily, as well as forest thinning in the Noyo River basin to reduce fuel available to forest fires.

The Land Trust continues to conserve the  land for its scenic and recreational values, construct trails so that people can more immediately connect to the beautiful landscapes that surround them, protect and restore waterways and forests which provide crucial wildlife habitat, preserve family farms and ranch lands for future generations to develop and enjoy, and will always be stewards of the natural landscape that they protect.